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Leta Foster has spent the last 35 years designing interiors so well that her three daughters followed in her footsteps, becoming the "& Associates" in her firm. When this breakfast room project in an early-1900s Richmond home came to Leta, she tapped daughter Sallie Giordano to collaborate. Together, they decorated the space to fit a young family while honoring its original architect, William Bottomley.
In this dining room by designer Michel Biehn, contemporary art mixes easily with Chinese pottery and French antiques. French chandelier, 18th-c. Hemp and nettle tablecloth acquired by Michel Biehn in Kathmandu. Wooden milk dishes from 18-c. Medallion 18th-c. dining chairs, signed by Séné, in original leather. Photographs by John Stewart. Chinese, American, Korean and French Vases.
Tired of that blank wall turning a well-crafted ensemble into a listless living room or drab kitchen? Adding a piece of wall art like this is perfect for brightening up a bare space and adding a personalized touch to your home. Perfect for any wine lover, this piece features glasses of wine and cheese with a wood-look background. PRinted in North America on canvas this piece is wrapped around a wood frame for a gallery-style look. And with included wall mounting hardware, it arrives ready to...
The backs of dining room chairs should definitely be taller than the top of the dining table but how much taller is a matter of personal preference.  When dining chairs are lower in height, it feels more modern whereas taller chairs tend to make a room feel more traditional and formal. If you’re using different side and end chairs, your end chairs should be taller than your side chairs.
This Locust Valley, New York, dining room by designer Meg Braff takes its color cues from a pair of antique chinoiserie panels that flank the entrance. A punchy table cloth by Lulu DK and the grass cloth wall covering by Meg Braff Designs provide relaxed contrast to the room’s more formal antiques, like the Regency chairs from Rumi Antiques and the Baltic crystal chandelier, and other décor, such as the apple green drapery and valance, both in a fabric from Holland & Sherry. A black lacquer credenza, by Jansen, grounds the pastel space with sophisticated polish.

Liven up your space by featuring pretty prints on rugs, window treatments, pillows nad more. Block print dhurrie rugs can command a pretty penny. To get the look for less, use a pretty wall stencil to apply a pattern to a large piece of artist canvas or drop cloth with a foam stencil brush. For an 8' by 10' rug, you'll need about a quart of standard interior paint in a satin finish. Wash stencil every other use to keep paint from clumping and elaving unwanted marks on the rug. 


Leta Foster has spent the last 35 years designing interiors so well that her three daughters followed in her footsteps, becoming the "& Associates" in her firm. When this breakfast room project in an early-1900s Richmond home came to Leta, she tapped daughter Sallie Giordano to collaborate. Together, they decorated the space to fit a young family while honoring its original architect, William Bottomley.
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