I’ve been wondering what can be done to separate a dining room and living room if they are in the same space. I’ve been looking at purchasing new dining room furniture. I’m glad that you mentioned putting in a rug for the dining room. In the photo, the rug does look like it separates the dining room from the living room. This might be something that I will consider as I shop around.


In this large dining room in Provence, designer Susan Bednar Long covered the walls, painted Wimborne White by Farrow & Ball, with collections of paintings, antique delftware and faience pottery, and a large gilt-wood mirror. Reproduction French dining chairs in a lighter finish and upholstered in a Swedish blue check from Chelsea Textiles, plus patinaed lighting (the antique chandelier is from Antiquities Ramis and the sconces are from Jamb) fill the renovated farmhouse with a casual, old-world charm.
Designer, decoupage artist, and shop-owner John Derian embraced the intimacy of the small dining room in his New York shop by cladding the walls in a large scale cabbage rose wallpaper he designed based on a 19th century Currier & Ives painting. An eclectic mix of seating, including a slipcovered sofa piled with pillows and vintage side and arm chairs, further amps up the cozy feel. Derian set the table with his own tableware collection, which features floral images from old instructional texts.

Inspired by the lush landscape just outside the windows (which were salvaged from an old train depot!), the homeowner of this 105-year-old Victorian farmhouse filled the dining room with rustic wood elements and pops of green. The Beech wishbone chairs, which are lacquered in an apple green, pop against the large antique hutch that stores the homeowner's collection of copper Moscow mule mugs and green and white china. A pale pink Oriental rug with subtle hints of sky blue and chartreuse rounds out the mix.
The ceiling is just as important as the floor – sometimes more so. If you want to create an intimate feel for your dinner parties, visually lower a ceiling by installing a dark feature, like a stained wood slat design. This tip can work in just about any room dimensions but use caution on low ceilings, you don’t want to leave your diners feeling claustrophobic.
Designer, decoupage artist, and shop-owner John Derian embraced the intimacy of the small dining room in his New York shop by cladding the walls in a large scale cabbage rose wallpaper he designed based on a 19th century Currier & Ives painting. An eclectic mix of seating, including a slipcovered sofa piled with pillows and vintage side and arm chairs, further amps up the cozy feel. Derian set the table with his own tableware collection, which features floral images from old instructional texts.
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