At Wayfair, we try to make sure you always have many options for your home. That's why we have so many kitchen & dining wall art for sale on our site, including kitchen & dining wall art from brands like Ophelia & Co. and Bay Isle Home. We want to make sure when you're looking for where to buy kitchen & dining wall art online, you're getting the one that's exactly right for you, whether that's the 'Ocean Ikat A' Graphic Art Print on Wood, the 'July from Twelve Months of Fruit' Framed Print, or something entirely different and unique to your home. We have thousands of great deals every day with no need for a coupon. There's never been a better time to "Wayfair my kitchen & dining wall art".
In this sunny breakfast room, designer Meg Braff brought in the greens of the garden for a soothing connection between indoors and outdoors. The lattice wallpaper, by Meg Braff Designs, camouflages the rooms tight quarters, while the apple-green molding, painted Sweet Daphne by Benjamin Moore, draws the eye up. The Serge Roche-style chairs are covered Bernard Thorp botanical-print linen.

Whether hung side by side or split up to double the decor around your abode, this two-piece framed print set is always sure to draw the eye. Showcasing two different, but coordinating, painted scenes with pots filled with blooming florals, each showcases subdued neutral hues of green, brown and beige. Made in North America, this pair is printed on paper, then highlighted by a 23'' H x 11'' W x 0.75'' D frame.


Leta Foster has spent the last 35 years designing interiors so well that her three daughters followed in her footsteps, becoming the "& Associates" in her firm. When this breakfast room project in an early-1900s Richmond home came to Leta, she tapped daughter Sallie Giordano to collaborate. Together, they decorated the space to fit a young family while honoring its original architect, William Bottomley.
I'm Betsy, Home Decor Enthusiast, Yorkie Mama, Crafter, Blogger, Picky Eater, Chief Mess Maker, Antique Hoarder and Graphic Designer. You can generally find me working on (attacking with a paintbrush) the 3 bed, 2 bath home we are currently renting! Our home might not be perfect but it is ours & if you hang out long enough you'll see that what we lack in know-how we make up for in passion!
Covered my grandmothers 4 dining room chairs perfectly! Great fit and updated a 60 year old family dining room set. Will need to line the the back of chairs because when the light hits the chair you can see through the fabric, but that is easy fix! Love them! Was totally surprised. (the 2 end chairs have arms, so bought set of 6, and will cut the fabric of the 2 extra covers and cover the bottom insert so those chairs will "match")
I’ve been wondering what can be done to separate a dining room and living room if they are in the same space. I’ve been looking at purchasing new dining room furniture. I’m glad that you mentioned putting in a rug for the dining room. In the photo, the rug does look like it separates the dining room from the living room. This might be something that I will consider as I shop around.

Remember Emily Gilmore’s painting of Richard from the Year in the Life episodes? Yup? Okay unless you’re really trying to make a statement that’s too big! Use your furniture for reference. If one area is your living room area and is anchored by a couch your piece of art shouldn’t be bigger than the couch. I’ve found that about 2/3 the length of the couch is the perfect size for a large piece of art. Go down in scale from there!


For rectangular dining tables, ideally allow a minimum of 24″-28″ of table length per person and some additional inches at the corners (how much space is needed at the corners depends upon the table width – more additional space is needed for narrower tables than for wider tables). Always consider the location of the table’s legs/base in determining how many people it will comfortably seat. Also consider the width of your dining chairs – if you have wider than average chairs, the amount of table length per person will need to be greater.
Designer, decoupage artist, and shop-owner John Derian embraced the intimacy of the small dining room in his New York shop by cladding the walls in a large scale cabbage rose wallpaper he designed based on a 19th century Currier & Ives painting. An eclectic mix of seating, including a slipcovered sofa piled with pillows and vintage side and arm chairs, further amps up the cozy feel. Derian set the table with his own tableware collection, which features floral images from old instructional texts.
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