Brilliant in both hue and expression, this painting brings a contemporary style with palpable texture to your space like the semiprecious stone, the hues throughout this acrylic painting are beautiful and bright. The various hues throughout this piece are abstractly executed with a painting knife to create both clean and fragmented lines with smooth and raised textures.
Use these stunning dining room ideas, all pulled from designer homes, to update your space with elevated decor that will impress friends and family. From clever ways to make small spaces seem larger to inspiring upgrades for walls, lighting, furniture, and flooring, there’s dining room décor to suit every style. Now, it’s time to plan your next dinner party.
Elegant style takes a laidback turn in this New York City dining room designed by Ashley Whittaker. A woven rug from Serena and Lily sets a casual tone for the bold Prussian blue Gracie wallcovering and a slew of antiques, like the table from Christie’s and the chandelier. Whittaker also shook things up by upholstering the dining chairs, from John Rosselli & Associates, in two fabrics: the outside backs are covered in a floral Muriel Brandolini fabric while inside backs and seats in a plum Global Leathers leather. Silk curtains from Scalamandre plus an antique mirror from 1stdibs play up the room’s height.
Painting of two pieces of fruit hanging from a branch with textured abstract background. Primary colors in this artwork include: Orange, Dark Gray, Gray. This proprietary canvas provides a classic and distinctive texture, while archival UV protectant inks make it scratch and fade resistant. The fabric base is flexible to support tight corners. The finished canvas print is mounted on a sturdy yet lightweight board to protect against warping, overstretching, or loose, sagging prints. It is then...
The homeowners wanted to have a fresh, bright dining room, so designer Ashley Whittaker helped them pick a showstopping lettuce green shade for the shiny lacquered walls and then kicked it up a notch with bright coral upholstered dining chairs. Painted lantern sconces and a sleek, four-arm, unlacquered brass chandelier play off the casual mood established by the sweet/tart color scheme.
Whether hung side by side or split up to double the decor around your abode, this two-piece framed print set is always sure to draw the eye. Showcasing two different, but coordinating, painted scenes with pots filled with blooming florals, each showcases subdued neutral hues of green, brown and beige. Made in North America, this pair is printed on paper, then highlighted by a 23'' H x 11'' W x 0.75'' D frame.
We focus on meal times during annual special festivities and personal anniversaries, but sitting down to break bread together is something that should always carry a sense of ceremony. Enjoying this daily activity with the added shine of a luxury dining room design means that every day can feel like a special occasion - without all the added prep and hoo-ha. Inspiration for luxury dining furniture and decor can come in many shapes and forms, so we have put together a whopping 51 images of our favourite dining room decor schemes to draw inspiration from. Plus, we offer a few tips and tricks that can be adapted to fit many different room sizes and budgets.

Remember Emily Gilmore’s painting of Richard from the Year in the Life episodes? Yup? Okay unless you’re really trying to make a statement that’s too big! Use your furniture for reference. If one area is your living room area and is anchored by a couch your piece of art shouldn’t be bigger than the couch. I’ve found that about 2/3 the length of the couch is the perfect size for a large piece of art. Go down in scale from there!
Leta Foster has spent the last 35 years designing interiors so well that her three daughters followed in her footsteps, becoming the "& Associates" in her firm. When this breakfast room project in an early-1900s Richmond home came to Leta, she tapped daughter Sallie Giordano to collaborate. Together, they decorated the space to fit a young family while honoring its original architect, William Bottomley.
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